Despite Own Reconstruction Expenses, Japan Pledges Not to Cut African Aid

A Japanese woman, one of the thousands affected by the March 11 quake, cleans some of her personal belongings in a crack in the pier in Ishinomaki. Japan will not cut back on its development assistance to Africa despite facing high reconstruction cost in the aftermath of twin disasters in March, according to a Japanese official. Photo by: Mark Stroud

Japan will not cut back on its development assistance to Africa despite facing high reconstruction cost in the aftermath of March’s earthquake and tsunami, a Japanese spokesperson told African ministers in Senegal.

The Japanese government initially considered cutting its aid to the region, but it was “deeply touched” by the support offered by African countries and decided to maintain all its aid commitments to Africa, Satoru Satoh explained, according to Agence France-Presse.

Algeria, Sudan, Rwanda, South Africa and several other African countries sent humanitarian aid and rescue teams to Japan as it was reeling from the effects of the devastating earthquake and tsunami.

Japan has pledged to double its aid to Africa to $1.8 billion by 2012 under the Yokohama Action Plan, AFP notes, adding that the country has already exceeded this target in 2009, during which it disbursed $2.05 billion to the region. 

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    Ivy Mungcal

    As former senior staff writer, Ivy Mungcal contributed to several Devex publications. Her focus is on breaking news, and in particular on global aid reform and trends in the United States, Europe, the Caribbean, and the Americas. Before joining Devex in 2009, Ivy produced specialized content for U.S. and U.K.-based business websites.