DfID Opens New Grant Round under Global Poverty Action Fund

A postcard bears all eight Millennium Development Goals. The U.K. Department for International Development is now accepting proposals for projects that can help accelerate progress toward the MDGs. Photo by: U.S. Mission Geneva / CC BY

The U.K. Department for International Development is now accepting proposals for projects that can help accelerate progress toward the Millennium Development Goals, particularly those that are most off the track, such as maternal and child health.

The application period for the second grant round under the Global Poverty Action Fund’s Impact Window ends Sept. 19, 2011.

The Impact Window targets nonprofits registered in the United Kingdom and 28 developing countries, though the projects may be implemented outside these developing nations so long as they are among the 43 selected project countries.

Each winning non-governmental organization may be awarded up to three grants but the annual value of each grant should be less than 40 percent of its annual income. The awardee, however, must be ready to provide matched funding of at least 25 percent.

“Proposals deemed to be technically strong would stand an increased chance of being successful if they demonstrate a level of match funding above the minimum 25%,” DfID says in its website.

In May, DfID launched the second funding round of the facility’s Innovation Window, which supports projects that offer innovative solutions to reducing poverty in developing countries. 

>> DfID Invites Proposals for Global Poverty Action Fund

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  • Eliza Villarino

    Eliza Villarino currently manages one of today’s leading publications on humanitarian aid, global health and international development, the weekly GDB. At Devex, she has helped grow a global newsroom, with talented journalists from major development hubs such as Washington, D.C, London and Brussels. She regularly writes about innovations in global development.