In Doha, a last-minute scramble for climate deal and aid

Commitments have been pouring in, but will advocates be satisfied with actual takeaways from this year’s biggest conference on climate change, which ends Dec. 7? Photo by: sallie_shatz

Commitments have been pouring in, but will advocates be satisfied with actual takeaways from this year’s biggest conference on climate change, which ends Dec. 7?

Different development stakeholders had hoped this year’s two-week conference in Doha, Qatar, would result in agreements on the future of the Kyoto Protocol, climate finance and emission targets, among others. But so far, only the following have been achieved:

  • Six countries joined the Climate and Clean Air Coalition, a voluntary partnership of 25 countries, 26 nonstate members and the European Commission that focuses on the reduction of short-lived climate pollutants.

  • The U.N. Environment Program launched the Africa Adaptation Knowledge Network — an online platform to facilitate exchange and proper use of climate change knowledge and experiences.

  • The United Kingdom outlined the projects it will be spending the 150 million pounds ($241.5 million) it has committed as climate funding until 2015.

  • Germany, France, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands and the European Commission pledged 6.85 billion euros ($8.95 billion) in climate funding for the next two years.

  • The U.N. Climate Change Secretariat and the World Economic Forum‘s “Momentum for Change: Innovative Financing for Climate-friendly Investment” initiative was unveiled.

  • The African Development Bank released a new report outlining “concrete” ways for Africa to gain access to the Green Climate Fund. This comes on the heels of the World Bank’s report highlighting the impact climate change will have on the Arab world.

  • Norway signed a $30 million agreement to support the second phase of the U.N.-REDD National Program in Vietnam.

Among discussions at the conference were Africa’s ongoing efforts to gain access to global climate change adaptation resources, but AfDB Vice President Aly Abou-Sabaa said priority actions on “how to receive and what to do with the funds when it’s available” have yet to be settled.

And while some countries continue to support the Kyoto Protocol, suggestions for its extension or the establishment of another legally binding framework on greenhouse gas emissions have not moved forward due to nonparticipation of a group of nations, including the United States, China and India.

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    Adrienne Valdez

    Adrienne Valdez is a staff writer for Devex, covering breaking international development news for the Development Newswire. Before joining Devex, Adrienne worked as a news correspondent for a public-sector modernization publication.