Q&A: Intellectual property within DFAT's innovation program

Sarah Pearson, chief innovation officer at Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and head of innovationXchange, tries on augmented reality glasses. Photo from: Sarah Pearson

CANBERRA — When discussing innovation, intellectual property has links to politics and economics. There is an expectation that innovation can lead to new ideas patented, with new industries and businesses growing to support economies.

“We can add value by facilitating networks of stakeholders to connect the system, bringing collaborators together on neutral ground to foster and scale ideas into a commercially viable product.”

— Sarah Pearson, chief innovation officer, DFAT

Sarah Pearson, chief innovation officer at Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and head of innovationXchange, believes IP is an equally important part of the discussion for aid programs supporting innovation in low- and middle-income countries.

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About the author

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    Lisa Cornish

    Lisa Cornish is a Devex Reporter based in Canberra, where she focuses on the Australian aid community. Lisa formerly worked with News Corp Australia as a data journalist for the national network and was published throughout Australia in major metropolitan and regional newspapers, including the Daily Telegraph in Melbourne, Herald Sun in Melbourne, Courier-Mail in Brisbane, and online through news.com.au. Lisa additionally consults with Australian government providing data analytics, reporting and visualization services. Lisa was awarded the 2014 Journalist of the Year by the New South Wales Institute of Surveyors.