Shamina Singh: 5 ways the best PPPs can exchange more than money

Shamina Singh, president of the MasterCard Center for Inclusive Growth and a member of the United States Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Public-Private Partnerships. Photo by: Benedikt von Loebell / World Economic Forum

The global development sector is seeing an increasing flow of executives and workers move across the public-private divide, bringing ideas with them across the border.

One of those is Shamina Singh, a member of the United States Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on Public-Private Partnerships. Singh has worked on government and public affairs for Nike and Citigroup, as well as holding senior positions in the White House and U.S. House of Representatives working on health care and minority groups, among other issues. She is currently president of the MasterCard Center for Inclusive Growth, and chair of the board of the Corporation for National and Community Service, a U.S. federal agency responsible for engaging citizens in community work.

Devex spoke to Singh at the World Economic Forum on the Middle East and North Africa in Jordan recently, about what she has learned from her time on both sides of the fence about how to maximize the potential of public-private partnerships.

Singh told Devex that “it's almost like the public and private sector are actually coming closer together.” At the time that she made the switch it was seen as a much bigger shift, she said, “but now I think there are a lot of people like me ... You're seeing a lot more cross-pollination between the two sectors. It's a realization that solutions have to work together.”

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About the author

  • Jessica abrahams

    Jessica Abrahams

    Jessica Abrahams is Devex's Associate Editor for Europe. Based in London, she was previously an editor at Prospect magazine and has written for publications including the Guardian, the Telegraph, Bloomberg News, and Germany's taz.die tageszeitung with a focus on global women's rights and social affairs. She holds graduate degrees in journalism from City University London and in international relations from Institut Barcelona d'Estudis Internacionals.