Staff welfare: Helping aid workers so they can help others

By Kelli Rogers 22 September 2015

Watch this video clip with KonTerra Group’s Lynne Cripe, whose expertise is in working with organization and individuals to foster resilience in high-risk environments.

The humanitarian system is stretched with the growing number of crises around the world. In the face of combatting immense challenges like disease, famine, poverty and war, the challenges of the aid worker are often overlooked.

But the physical, emotional and psychological toll humanitarians and their families face is undeniable, especially for those working in conflict. While most will agree staff welfare deserves more attention, knowing how to better support your staff — or yourself — is less obvious.

For this reason, Devex hosted a webinar with health and effectiveness consulting firm KonTerra Group’s Lynne Cripe, whose expertise is in working with organizations and individuals to foster resilience in high-risk environments.

There’s at least two reasons why we should care about issues of staff welfare and psychological well-being, according to Cripe. One is organizational cost and the other is personal cost.

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About the author

Mechosen
Kelli Rogers@kellierin

In her role as associate editor, Kelli Rogers helps to shape Devex content around leadership, professional growth and careers for professionals in international development, humanitarian aid and global health. As the manager of Doing Good, one of Devex's highest-circulation publications, she is constantly on the lookout for the latest staffing changes, hiring trends and tricks for recruiting skilled local and international staff for aid projects that make a difference. Kelli has studied or worked in Spain, Costa Rica and Kenya.


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