Grant

Designing the 2015 Global Climate Change Agreement

Funded by EuropeAid Co-operation Office - EuropeAID
Location Worldwide
Status
Deadline
Express interest by 22 Dec 2012

 
1.1    BackgroundENRTP Thematic Programme for Environment and Sustainable Management of Natural ResourcesOn 18 December 2006 the European Parliament and the Council adopted Regulation (EC) N° 1905/2006.  This Regulation applies from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2013. It establishes a financing instrument for development cooperation (DCI Regulation) and forms the legal basis for the Commission to manage certain budget lines/items related to the implementation of certain external relations geographical and thematic programmes. This DCI Regulation was amended by the Regulation (EU) Nº 1339/2011 of 13 December 2011.Article 13 of the DCI Regulation lays down the basis for the strategic multi-annual programme on “Environment and sustainable management of natural resources, including energy” (ENRTP Strategy Paper). The Thematic Programme for Environment and Sustainable Management of Natural Resources including Energy (ENRTP) helps developing countries and partner organisations to address environmental and natural resource management issues. This programme complements targeted actions from geographical programmes focusing on actions that foster innovation, stimulate cross country experience sharing and target EU policy priorities.The ENRTP is part of the EU’s response to help countries tackle the increasing environmental challenges and contribute to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal on environment. Through the ENRTP, the EU has dedicated resources to help developing countries and partner organisations address environmental and natural resource management issues and meet their obligations under Multi-lateral Environment Agreements (MEAs) and to take international policy leadership. The ENRTP Strategy Paper for the period 2011-2013 , builds on the 2007-2010 Strategy (Decision C/2007/2572) and the mid-term review that was carried out in 2009. It was approved by the Commission on the 21 December 2010, and provides an indicative amount available for the period 2011-2013 of approximately €517 million. The EU policy priorities of the ENRTP Strategy Paper 2011 - 2013 are: 1) to help partner countries, in particular the most vulnerable ones, to adapt to the impacts of climate change; support the development of mitigation actions, including on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), and key implementing tools ; promote the conclusion of an ambitious and global climate agreement; and provide a framework for supply of sustainable energy in developing countries; 2) to support sustainable management of natural resources with a focus on forest governance through implementation of the Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Action Plan and the EU’s Biodiversity Strategy  as well as to reduce the ecological footprint of the growing population and protect human health by promoting the green economy; and 3) to implement the international environmental and climate dimension of the EU’s 2020 vision.Designing the 2015 Global Climate Change AgreementThe Durban climate change conference in December 2011 agreed to launch a process, called the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP), “to develop a protocol, another legal instrument or an agreed outcome with legal force under the Convention applicable to all Parties” (the 2015 Agreement)  . The ADP is to complete its work as early as possible but no later than 2015, to come into effect and be implemented from 2020. The EU, supported by a large number of other developed and developing countries, has made clear that it views the result of this work to be in the shape of a new legally binding Protocol under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).Although the science of climate change is now generally accepted, the level of ambition of those participating in the negotiations differs. Furthermore, while most Parties accept that a new framework to follow on from the Kyoto Protocol is necessary, there is divergence between Parties over the shape such agreement should take. The political messages and the technical responses vary in the degree of “buy in”, reflecting the socio-economic and political positions of Parties.There is a need for a broader intellectual reflection, going beyond the UNFCCC/Kyoto Protocol negotiating frameworks, in which political, social, economic and geographical perspectives can be brought together and synthesized through a system of networking of think tanks, NGOs or centres of academic excellence. The fruit of this networking, which should include a draft new international agreement and “explanatory memorandum”, as well as supporting papers on key elements of this agreement, would inform the participants in the ADP process, the politicians and the members of the scientific and technical committees, so that a consensual legal framework could be adopted by 2015 and implemented from 2020.


 


European Commission
Directorate-General for Climate Action

Thematic Programme for Environment and Sustainable Management of Natural Resources, including Energy
Restricted Call for Proposals for Designing the 2015 Global Climate Change Agreement


Guidelines
for grant applicants

Budget line 21.0401
Reference: EuropeAid/133686/C/ACT/MULTI
Deadline for submission of Concept Notes: 22d December  2012 at 13:00 hrs (Brussels date and time)

1.    DESIGNING THE 2015 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AGREEMENT

    1.1    Background
ENRTP Thematic Programme for Environment and Sustainable Management of Natural Resources

On 18 December 2006 the European Parliament and the Council adopted Regulation (EC) N° 1905/2006.  This Regulation applies from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2013. It establishes a financing instrument for development cooperation (DCI Regulation) and forms the legal basis for the Commission to manage certain budget lines/items related to the implementation of certain external relations geographical and thematic programmes. This DCI Regulation was amended by the Regulation (EU) Nº 1339/2011 of 13 December 2011.

Article 13 of the DCI Regulation lays down the basis for the strategic multi-annual programme on “Environment and sustainable management of natural resources, including energy” (ENRTP Strategy Paper). The Thematic Programme for Environment and Sustainable Management of Natural Resources including Energy (ENRTP) helps developing countries and partner organisations to address environmental and natural resource management issues. This programme complements targeted actions from geographical programmes focusing on actions that foster innovation, stimulate cross country experience sharing and target EU policy priorities.

The ENRTP is part of the EU’s response to help countries tackle the increasing environmental challenges and contribute to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal on environment. Through the ENRTP, the EU has dedicated resources to help developing countries and partner organisations address environmental and natural resource management issues and meet their obligations under Multi-lateral Environment Agreements (MEAs) and to take international policy leadership. The ENRTP Strategy Paper for the period 2011-2013 , builds on the 2007-2010 Strategy (Decision C/2007/2572) and the mid-term review that was carried out in 2009. It was approved by the Commission on the 21 December 2010, and provides an indicative amount available for the period 2011-2013 of approximately €517 million.

The EU policy priorities of the ENRTP Strategy Paper 2011 - 2013 are: 1) to help partner countries, in particular the most vulnerable ones, to adapt to the impacts of climate change; support the development of mitigation actions, including on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), and key implementing tools ; promote the conclusion of an ambitious and global climate agreement; and provide a framework for supply of sustainable energy in developing countries; 2) to support sustainable management of natural resources with a focus on forest governance through implementation of the Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Action Plan and the EU’s Biodiversity Strategy  as well as to reduce the ecological footprint of the growing population and protect human health by promoting the green economy; and 3) to implement the international environmental and climate dimension of the EU’s 2020 vision.

Designing the 2015 Global Climate Change Agreement
The Durban climate change conference in December 2011 agreed to launch a process, called the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP), “to develop a protocol, another legal instrument or an
agreed outcome with legal force under the Convention applicable to all Parties” (the 2015 Agreement)  . The ADP is to complete its work as early as possible but no later than 2015, to come into effect and be implemented from 2020. The EU, supported by a large number of other developed and developing countries, has made clear that it views the result of this work to be in the shape of a new legally binding Protocol under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Although the science of climate change is now generally accepted, the level of ambition of those participating in the negotiations differs. Furthermore, while most Parties accept that a new framework to follow on from the Kyoto Protocol is necessary, there is divergence between Parties over the shape such agreement should take. The political messages and the technical responses vary in the degree of “buy in”, reflecting the socio-economic and political positions of Parties.

There is a need for a broader intellectual reflection, going beyond the UNFCCC/Kyoto Protocol negotiating frameworks, in which political, social, economic and geographical perspectives can be brought together and synthesized through a system of networking of think tanks, NGOs or centres of academic excellence. The fruit of this networking, which should include a draft new international agreement and “explanatory memorandum”, as well as supporting papers on key elements of this agreement, would inform the participants in the ADP process, the politicians and the members of the scientific and technical committees, so that a consensual legal framework could be adopted by 2015 and implemented from 2020.
 
    1.2    Objectives of the programme

The objectives of this call for proposals fall within the scope of priority 3 of the ENRTP: Strengthening Environmental and Climate Governance.

The global objective is to support the negotiations under the ADP. This will include arranging for dialogue, research and in-depth analysis. In addition, on the basis of this work and progress in the negotiations, the programme will develop a draft new international agreement, with explanatory memorandum and supporting papers on its key elements. This work must be carried out by organisations such as NGOs, think tanks or centres of academic excellence from a broad and representative range of countries, including major emerging economies, Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States. The outputs of this call for proposals will be used within an international negotiations forum.

The specific objective is the development of options on how the new agreement should address all elements of the ADP workstream on the 2015 Agreement, including mitigation, adaptation, finance, technology development and transfer, transparency of action and support and capacity building.
This will be achieved through the following expected results:

•    Engagement with and building upon inputs from a wide range of stakeholders including NGOs, think tanks or centres of academic excellence from a broad and representative range of countries, including major emerging economies, Least Developed Countries and Small Island Developing States;
•    The analysis of various ideas and proposals put forward by Parties, as well as earlier relevant research work;
•    Further elaboration of existing or, where possible, the development of new ideas and approaches. The aim of such ideas and approaches should be to support compromises and
build consensus in the work of the ADP that ensure the broadest possible support for and participation in the 2015 Agreement as well as help ensure its effectiveness in addressing the climate challenge;
•    Testing results with stakeholders from a broad and representative range of countries;
•    The elaboration of a work plan and timetable, as well as a well-timed range of deliverables and work methodologies, including meetings with stakeholders to test options and ideas developed in the programme;
•    The finalisation of a proposed text for the 2015 Agreement by end of March 2015 at the latest;  
•    The provision of regular, clearly defined and relevant outputs to inform participants in the ADP process in a timely manner ahead of relevant formal or informal meetings of the UNFCCC.


    1.3    Financial allocation provided by the contracting authority
The overall indicative amount made available under this Call for Proposals is EUR 1,500,000. The Contracting Authority reserves the right not to award all available funds.

Size of grants
Any grant requested under this Call for Proposals must fall between the following minimum and maximum amounts:

-minimum amount: EUR 500,000
-maximum amount: EUR 1,500,000

Any grant requested under this Call for Proposals can be funded up to 100% of total eligible costs of the action. (see also Section 2.1.4).

The balance (i.e. the difference between the total cost of the action and the amount requested from the Contracting Authority) must be financed from the applicant’s or partners’ own resources, or from sources other than the European Union budget or the European Development Fund .

The grant may cover the entire eligible costs of the action if this is deemed essential to carry it out. If that is the case, the applicant must justify full financing in Section 2.1 of Part B of the grant application form.  Obligatory in the case the basic act/financing decision/financing agreement exclude financing of taxes.
 
    2.2    How to apply and the procedures to follow
     2.2.1    Concept Note content
Applications must be submitted in accordance with the instructions on the Concept Note included in the Grant Application Form annexed to these Guidelines (Annex A).

Applicants must apply in English.

In the Concept note, the applicants must only provide an estimate of the amount of contribution requested from the Contracting Authority. Only the applicants invited to submit a full application in the second phase will be required to present a detailed budget. The elements assessed on the basis of the concept note may not be modified by the applicant in the full application form. The EU contribution may not vary from the initial estimate by more than 20%. Any error or major discrepancy related to the points listed in the instructions on the Concept Note may lead to the rejection of the Concept Note.

Clarifications will only be requested when information provided is unclear, thus preventing the Contracting Authority from conducting an objective assessment.

Hand-written Concept Notes will not be accepted.

Please note that only the Concept Note form will be evaluated. It is therefore of utmost importance that this document contain ALL relevant information concerning the action. No additional annexes should be sent.

 

 

 

The above is a summarized version of the Original Procurement Notice.                          

 

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Designing the 2015 Global Climate Change Agreement

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