The U.S. Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. Photo by: REUTERS / Al Drago

LONDON — The U.S. Supreme Court decision that the World Bank does not have absolute immunity from prosecution is unlikely to trigger a flood of lawsuits but it could bolster calls for the institution to strengthen its internal accountability mechanisms, international lawyers said.

On Wednesday, America’s top justices handed down a landmark ruling in favor of a group of Indian villagers looking to sue the International Finance Corp. — the private sector arm of the World Bank — for its support for the coal-fired Tata Mundra Power Plant. The villagers said the project contaminated groundwater, killed marine life, and ejected coal ash into the air. IFC did not contest that the damage occurred, but argued it is immune from liability under U.S. law.

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About the author

  • Edwards sopie

    Sophie Edwards

    Sophie Edwards is a Reporter for Devex based in London covering global development news including global education, water and sanitation, innovative financing, the environment along with other topics. She has previously worked for NGOs, the World Bank and spent a number of years as a journalist for a regional newspaper in the U.K. She has an MA from the Institute of Development Studies and a BA from Cambridge University.