Why Bill Gates is backing, and blogging about, GMOs

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By Catherine Cheney

Bill Gates shares investments the Gates Foundation has made to help poor farmers adapt to the harsh realities of climate change. Could these tools set examples for how the Green Climate Fund might spend its $10 billion? Devex spoke with Geoff Lamb, chief economic and policy adviser to the co-chairs and CEO at the Gates Foundation.


Putting an end to global health's 'silent killer'

There are effective tools to prevent and treat viral hepatitis, yet it continues to kill more people each year than HIV or tuberculosis, Gottfried Hirnschall, the director of WHO's global hepatitis program, writes in this guest commentary. Could this week’s World Hepatitis Summit be the beginning of the end of this “silent killer”?


Asia-Pacific unites in battle against tuberculosis

A regional meeting that aims to create a unified voice in the fight against tuberculosis saw parliamentarians in attendance to commit to five deliverables, and highlighted the roles stronger R&D, donor assistance and NGO support can play to eliminate the disease worldwide by 2035.


Engaging men and boys to preserve women's land rights in Rwanda

Anna Knox, chief of party for the USAID-funded and Chemonics-implemented Rwanda Land Project, talks with Devex about how her team is engaging men and boys to preserve women's land rights in Rwanda.


Australia calls for private sector investment in aid

To encourage the private sector to increase investments in the Australian foreign aid program, Julie Bishop has launched an engagement strategy that also offers financial incentives for businesses that will work in developing countries.


Who's who in #globaldev: August 2015 executive appointments

The man responsible for setting up the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank has won the vote to become its inaugural president, while the woman who's been leading efforts to revamp global emergency aid is moving on.


Unleash demand to break the informal housing cycle

Despite widespread recognition and intention to address the global housing gap, the reality is that there is not enough money to build houses for the 1.6 billion people worldwide that continue to live in substandard shelters. How then can this gap be addressed?


Lessons from an advocacy champ

World Vision's EU advocacy champ may have stepped down from his post, but he's not quitting development work just yet — and has a few advocacy lessons for development executives.


5 social entrepreneurship must-reads

Social entrepreneurship is on the rise, but there are still questions about how it works and when it works. Want to learn more? Check out these recommendations of what to read.


Why farms of the future need to mix livestock and crops

The failure to appreciate the many ways livestock intersect with climate change and food security may reflect wealthy country bias that no longer views livestock as integral to farming, a principal scientist at the International Livestock Research Institute writes in this guest commentary.


Will more data lead to better public health programs?

Despite significant advances and development in global health, many people still die from preventable and curable diseases. Experts say big data can help address this problem — but with a few caveats, Devex has learned.


Inside Development

Unleash demand to break the informal housing cycle

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Despite widespread recognition and intention to address the global housing gap, the reality is that there is not enough money to build houses for the 1.6 billion people worldwide that continue to live in substandard shelters. How then can this gap be addressed?

Global Views

Putting an end to global health's 'silent killer'

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There are effective tools to prevent and treat viral hepatitis, yet it continues to kill more people each year than HIV or tuberculosis, Gottfried Hirnschall, the director of WHO's global hepatitis program, writes in this guest commentary. Could this week’s World Hepatitis Summit be the beginning of the end of this “silent killer”?

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