Learning from Ebola means ensuring that a universal health coverage agenda will actually help avoid future catastrophes like this one. A joint commentary by three senior officials with Management Sciences for Health urge ahead of UHC Day.

The views in this opinion piece do not necessarily reflect Devex's editorial views.

About the authors

  • Chelsey Canavan

    Chelsey R. Canavan is a research and communications specialist with Management Sciences for Health, a global non-profit that develops sustainable health systems in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. She also serves as deputy coordinator of Health for All Post-2015, a global campaign of civil society organizations advocating for universal health coverage in the post-2015 development agenda. She was an ASPPH Allan Rosenfield Global Health Fellow at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and has a MSPH in health policy and management from the University of North Carolina.
  • Jonathan Jay

    Jonathan S. Jay is an attorney, bioethicist and senior writer for Management Sciences for Health, a global nonprofit that develops sustainable health systems in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Previously affiliated with Georgetown University and the National Institutes of Health, Jay serves as coordinator of Health for All Post-2015, a global campaign of civil society organizations advocating for universal health coverage in the post-2015 development agenda.
  • Jonathan Quick

    Jonathan Quick is president and chief executive officer of Management Sciences for Health, a non-profit global health organization that develops sustainable health systems in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Quick is also a faculty member at Harvard Medical School and chair of the Global Health Council. Prior to joining MSH, he was the director of Essential Drugs & Medicines Policy at the World Health Organization.