Delivering a new urban agenda for development

What can the global development community expect from Habitat III? Devex senior global development reporter Michael Igoe speaks with Frédéric Bontems, director for sustainable development at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development.

This year the international community has a number of opportunities to try and get to grips with some of the most powerful demographic forces changing the face of poverty and development and to forge a new urban agenda.

Today, more people live in cities than in rural areas, and the migration of people from towns and villages to cities will only accelerate in the coming years.

In October, world leaders will convene at Habitat III, the first Habitat summit for two decades, to consider how investments in the global built environment can be more responsive and better aligned to the realities of where people live today — and where they will live tomorrow.

Devex spoke with Frédéric Bontems, director for sustainable development at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Development, to learn about French priorities for Habitat III — and how well he thinks the global development community will align efforts around an increasingly urban future.

What do you want to see on the #NewUrbanAgenda? Over the next six months Habitat for Humanity, Cities Alliance and Devex will join forces to explore the future of our increasingly urbanized world in the run up to Habitat III in October. Spread the word, share your views below or tag @devex and #NewUrbanAgenda.

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About the author

  • Igoe michael 1

    Michael Igoe

    Michael Igoe is a Senior Reporter with Devex, based in Washington, D.C. He covers U.S. foreign aid, global health, climate change, and development finance. Prior to joining Devex, Michael researched water management and climate change adaptation in post-Soviet Central Asia, where he also wrote for EurasiaNet. Michael earned his bachelor's degree from Bowdoin College, where he majored in Russian, and his master’s degree from the University of Montana, where he studied international conservation and development.