How to make global health partnerships work: Key insights from the field

The Tiptop program will introduce community-level distribution of quality-assured sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine to 400,000 pregnant women and their babies in Mozambique, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, and Madagascar. Screengrab from Youtube

MAPUTO, Mozambique — Partnership will be the key to UNITAID’s new $50 million, five-year investment in increasing antimalarial treatment for pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa.

The Transforming Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Optimal Pregnancy — or Tiptop — program will introduce community-level distribution of quality-assured sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to 400,000 pregnant women and their babies in Mozambique, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, and Madagascar, and inform change in policy recommendations from the World Health Organization. 

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About the author

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    Gloria Pallares

    Gloria Pallares is a journalist reporting on sustainable development, global health and humanitarian aid from Africa and Europe. Her work has appeared in a range of publications including El Pais, Forbes, CIFOR’s Forest News and the leading media outlets in Spain via the multimedia newswire Europa Press.