Q&A: Peter Piot on grand challenges in research, education and training for global health

Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Photo by: Benedikt von Loebell / World Economic Forum / CC BY-NC-SA

As Peter Piot considers the future of global health, he has decades of experience to draw on, spanning back to before the term even existed. So when he talks about global health 2.0, as he did recently at an event at the University of Washington, people pay close attention. The director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, who is widely known for his role in helping discover the Ebola virus before becoming the founding executive director of UNAIDS, emphasized a few shifts he hopes to see.

“We’ve been very good at what I would call supply side innovation,” he said. “But where we’ve really paid less attention is what I call demand side innovation.”

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    Catherine Cheney

    Catherine Cheney is a Senior Reporter for Devex. She covers the West Coast of the U.S., focusing on the role of technology and innovation in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. And she frequently represents Devex as a speaker and moderator. Prior to joining Devex, Catherine earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Yale University, worked as a web producer for POLITICO and reporter for World Politics Review, and helped to launch NationSwell. Catherine has reported from all over the world, and freelanced for outlets including the Atlantic and the Washington Post. She is also the West Coast ambassador for the Solutions Journalism Network, a nonprofit that trains and connects journalists to cover responses to problems.