Doing business with DfID: A procurement process guide

After tightening its criteria for awarding grants, the U.K. Department for International Development last year released a code of conduct for implementing partners, which, among other things, underscores the donor country’s emphasis on achieving value for money.

The United Kingdom has pledged to bring foreign aid spending to 0.7 percent of gross national income by 2015, a promise U.K. Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne renewed recently in his 2014 budget statement to the Parliament. This means the donor country is likely to spend as much as 12 million pounds ($19.8 million) in official development assistance this year.

The more stringent procurement policies were implemented partly to assuage public outcry over foreign aid spending — and DfID’s ring-fenced budget — amid a weak domestic economy but also to respond to internal and independent reviews over DfID’s use of technical experts.

On top of these changes, U.K. Secretary of State for International Development Justine Greening has said that all contracts worth more than 1 million pounds must go to her for review and approval.

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About the author

  • Ec orlina 400x400

    Ezekiel Carlo Orlina

    Ezekiel is a senior development analyst and team leader at Devex. His primary role is monitoring and reporting on project opportunities and trends of leading multilateral and bilateral donor agencies. A graduate of Ateneo de Manila University with a degree in Political Science, Ezekiel has extensive global development research experience having also worked at the World Youth Alliance, Asia and the Pacific (WYAAP).