Ingenuity and innovation: Sustainable solutions to malnutrition

By Julie Espinosa 16 September 2016

David Fleming, vice president for public health impact at PATH, discusses the importance of a multisector response to malnutrition, overnutrition and micronutrient deficiency.

With more health issues caused by nutritional problems than any other risk factor, nutrition is a leading target for intervention. So what are some of the best long-term solutions?

Devex sat down with David Fleming, vice president for public health impact at PATH, at Women Deliver in Copenhagen, Denmark, in May, and discussed the importance of a multisector response to malnutrition, overnutrition and micronutrient deficiency.

When you think about really sustainable solutions, you have to be thinking about the private sector, Fleming told Devex global development reporter Helen Morgan.

David Nabarro: Malnutrition problem requires multipartner solutions

David Nabarro, special representative of the U.N. secretary-general for food security and nutrition, explains how the multifaceted problem of malnutrition requires multi-partner collaboration.

Tackling the issue requires ingenuity and innovation and there are already a number of innovative ways nutrition can be improved — by growing food closer to cities, or scaling up food fortification efforts, for example. It’s by taking advantage of these approaches that we can be successful, he said.

Watch the video above for more solutions-oriented ideas to improving nutrition and learn more about the importance of a multisector response.

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About the author

Espinosa julie
Julie Espinosa

Julie Espinosa is Devex's video producer, covering humanitarian aid, sustainable development and global health. Prior to joining Devex, Julie worked in documentary film production in Austin, Texas. She holds a master's degree in communications and cultural studies from Georgetown University and a bachelor's in visual arts from Harvard University.


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