The business of Australian foreign aid

By Lisa Cornish 10 August 2015

Australian aid-funded Health Educator, Min Lene, in conversation with Nurse Supervisor Toany Tamoaieta at the Republic of Nauru Hospital. Health is one of the key sectors which the Australian aid program focuses on. Photo by: Matt Robertson / DFAT / CC BY

The Australian aid program has evolved considerably under Tony Abbott’s Coalition government.

Funding for foreign aid has been dramatically reduced in addition to Australia’s geographic sphere of influence. The amalgamation of what was then the Australian Agency for International Development with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in November 2013 has seen a dramatic shift in policies — climate change is now seems to be a thing of the past with new policies aiming to encourage a greater focus on innovation, women, disability, health and trade.

Landmark report calls for red tape reduction in Australian aid

An Australian parliamentary committee has called on the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to take several steps to promote private sector engagement in the aid program. Sharman Stone, who heads of the panel, discussed exclusively with Devex some key recommendations.

A recent parliamentary inquiry into foreign aid, producing recommendations outlined in the report “Partnering for the Greater Good,” is also set to see a shift in policy, with DFAT currently preparing a response to recommendations.

But what will all of these mean for those who do business with DFAT and the Australian aid program?

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About the author

Cornish img
Lisa Cornish@lisa_cornish

Lisa Cornish is a freelance data journalist based in Canberra, Australia. Lisa formerly worked with News Corp Australia as a data journalist for the national network and was published throughout Australia in major metropolitan and regional newspapers, including the Daily Telegraph in Melbourne, Herald Sun in Melbourne, Courier-Mail in Brisbane and online through news.com.au. Lisa has recently been awarded the 2014 Journalist of the Year by the New South Wales Institute of Surveyors.


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